Category Archives: Events

CMS Meeting Thursday, February 12, 2015: Mushroom Identification with Artist Ann Goddard

Hypomyces by Ann Goddard

Hypomyces by Ann Goddard

Many of the mushrooms illustrated have not been identified.  Are there some which have yet to be named?  Probably.  The Cascade Mycological Society is invited to help suggest identities as they see some of the more than 800 illustrations captured by Ann Goddard.

Meet at 7:00 pm, room 115, Science Building (Building 16) at Lane Community College in Eugene. There will be a mushroom show and tell identification session prior to the speaker. Bring what’s in your basket, edible or not, and learn from the experienced members of our community.  The talk is free and open to the public.

SPEAKER BIO:

Ann Goddard grew up in Oregon and has spent almost 40 years illustrating Pacific Northwest mushrooms.  Intrigued by the many fungi sprouting along roadsides in Seattle, noticed while walking her dog, Ann began to try to identify them.  It became quickly clear that it would take very detailed examination to tell one little brown mushroom from the other. Frustrated by the limited illustrations in the field guides, she took up colored pencils.  Assisted by some early training at the Minneapolis College of Art and Design, she learned the challenges and joys of drawing from life objects which changed by the minute and were completely disintegrated in days, if not hours.

Ann is also a photographer, and has kept photographs, field notes, spore prints, and dried samples many of the mushrooms she’s illustrated.  Back in the 1970’s, she attended a number of mycological workshops and began trying to identify the mushrooms with the help of the likes of Dr. Alexander Smith, Paul Stamets, and others.

Copyright by Ann Goddard

Amanita by Ann Goddard

 

It’s been the challenge of illustrating every different fungus she finds on the central Oregon coast where she’s lived for the past 30+ years that has been her seasonal obsession.  No mushroom is too small or complicated to draw (though she’s thankful she’s yet to find a cauliflower mushroom).

“Mushrooms, Fungus and Forest” Science Pub

CMS founding members Chris Melotti and Molly Widmer will be the featured presenters at this month’s Science Pub at Axe & Fiddle Public House on Tuesday, January 27 from 5pm – 7pm in Cottage Grove.

The night will begin at 5pm with a happy hour with trivia & prizes followed by a Watershed Update from the the Coast Fork Willamette Watershed Council and Chris and Molly’s talk , ‘Mushrooms, Fungus and Forests”.

Science Pub Flyer_Jan2015

10% of all food and beverage sales from 5-7:30p will be donated to the Coast Fork Willamette Watershed Council, a non-profit, volunteer-based organization enhancing the Coast Fork Watershed through investigation, restoration, education, and stewardship.

All ages are welcome. Join science geeks and the not-so-science-savvy and help put the pub back into public meetings.

CMS Meeting Thursday, January 8, 2015: Speaker Alija Bajro Mujic

Rhizopogon_vinicolorFor the first meeting of the year, Alija Bajro Mujic will present his PhD research upon the false truffle genus Rhizopogon and its unique symbiosis with trees in genus Pseudotsuga (Douglas Fir). This talk will share the stories and the results gathered during 5 years of international and domestic field work in Pseudotsuga forests throughout the Pacific Rim. Together we will travel from Oregon to the balmy highlands of eastern Asia, the windswept chaparral of southern California, forested sky islands of the southwestern deserts, and the volcanic massifs of central Mexico. The results of this work reveal patterns of comigration and coevolution between Rhizopogon and Pseudotsuga which share a history of close association. This knowledge and its conservation implications will help to “complete the circle” of migration these genera have made around the northern Pacific Rim.

Meet at 7:00 pm, room 115, Science Building (Building 16) at Lane Community College in Eugene. There will be a mushroom show and tell identification session prior to the speaker. Bring what’s in your basket, edible or not, and learn from the experienced members of our community.  The talk is free and open to the public.

Speaker Bio:

Mr. Alija Bajro Mujic

Mr. Alija Bajro Mujic

Alija Bajro Mujic is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Botany and Plant Pathology at Oregon State University. Alija’s interest in Fungi was first cultivated through foraging as a member of the Santa Cruz Fungus Federation while he was completing his bachelor’s degrees at the University of California, Santa Cruz.

After undergraduate study, Alija found employment as a restoration ecologist where his interests in mycorrhizal fungi and conservation deepened and grew. These interests led Alija to pursue graduate study where he strives to develop a better understanding of mycorrhizal symbioses and their roles within forest ecology and conservation.

You can find more information about Alija and his work at http://people.oregonstate.edu/~mujica.

CMS Meeting: Professional Forager Toby Esthay

Toby Esthay photo by Rebecca Fyffe

Toby Esthay
photo by Rebecca Fyffe

Toby Esthay is the invited speaker for the Cascade Mycological Society Meeting on Thursday, December 11 at 7:00pm – 9:00pm. He is a professional forager in Oregon and plans to show his fantastic mushroom photography, chat briefly about truffling and answer questions from our members.

Meet at 7:00 pm, room 115, Science Building (Building 16) at Lane Community College in Eugene. There will be a mushroom show and tell identification session prior to the speaker. Bring what’s in your basket, edible or not, and learn from the experienced members of our community.

Cookbooks, earrings, and t-shirts will be available for sale at this meeting. It is free and open to the public

CMS Meeting: “Diversity and dispersal of tropical forest Xylariaceae” with Roo Vandegrift, Thursday, November 13, 2014

Roo Vandegrift is the invited speaker for the November Cascade Mycological Society Meeting.  Meet at  7:00 pm, room 115, Science Building (Building 16) at Lane Community College in Eugene.

There will be a mushroom show and tell identification session prior to the speaker. Bring what’s in your basket, edible or not, and learn from the experienced members of our community. The talk is free and open to the public.

Roo Vandegrift

Roo Vandegrift

About Roo

Roo Vandegrift was born in the Appalachian mountains of southwestern Virginia, but spent most of his childhood as an Air Force brat. He grew up in a succession of remarkably similarly boring military bases set in remarkably interestingly diverse locations around the world before his parents settled back in Virginia. Roo completed his undergraduate work at Virginia Tech, in Dr. RH Jones’ soil ecology lab, and then worked for several years at a venture capital funded biotech company, where he learned the meaning of “cut-throat” and “exit strategy.” Moving back to his roots, so to speak, he took a lab technician job with Dr. Brenda Casper at the University of Pennsylvania. There, he decided that he really did like fungal ecology enough to start a career in the field.

Roo is now in the fifth, and hopefully final, year of a PhD program in Dr. Bitty Roy’s lab at the University of Oregon, with a fair bit of shared advising by Dr. George Carroll. He received the NSF GRFP in 2011, and the MSA Graduate Fellowship in 2013, in addition to awards from the Sonoma County Mycological Association, the Cascade Mycological Society, and the Mycological Society of San Francisco. Also in 2013, he participated in NSF’s East Asia and Pacific Summer Institute (EAPSI) program in Taiwan, where he was able to work with the incomparable taxonomist Dr. Yu-Ming Ju. In 2014, MSA graciously awarded him the Mentor/Student Travel Award in honor of Dr. Alexopoulos.

Roo’s research is varied, and is tied together by endophytes, the fungi that live asymptomatically in the leaves and other tissues of plants. Among other things, he studies the role of a host-specific Epichloë endophyte in the invasion ecology of a noxious invasive grass in the Pacific Northwest, and the dispersal ecology of Xylaria endophytes in tropical systems, including Ecuador and Taiwan. At this year’s MSA meeting, he was awarded the Best Graduate Student Oral Presentation for his talk on the Epichloë/invasion ecology work, and the paper resulting from that project was recently accepted for publication in Biological Invasions.

After graduation, Roo intends to work on a thoroughly illustrated treatment of the Xylaria of the cloud forest of Ecuador, which will give him an excuse to spend most of a year drawing pictures of some the most morphologically interesting fungi in world. He expects to be actively seeking postdocs in 2016 or ’17, in projects that will allow him to continue practicing illustration as well as mycology. Roo has a particular interest in the taxonomy of neo-tropical stromatic ascomycetes and wood-rot fungi, as well as the ecology of symbiosis, particularly endophytism.