Leccinum pseudoscabrum

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Leccinum pseudoscabrum

Postby Tobiah on Tue Sep 16, 2008 1:06 am

Found almost 20 of these on the U of O campus today. Under Beech. Not supposed to be on the west coast, almost certain of the I.d. otherwise. Intense fruiting of several fungal species present in a very small area, these were most interesting to me though. anybody have a different i.d.?
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Re: Leccinum pseudoscabrum

Postby chickenofthewoods on Tue Sep 16, 2008 7:00 am

Leccinum species present more taxonomic trouble than it's worth, if you ask me. Most of them are quite delicious. Every year they are up around town wherever there are birch.

It should be noted that habitat range in this case has more to do with ornamentally planted trees than anything else.

I have eaten the Leccina from around Eugene every year without any ill-effects. What's wrong with simply scabrum?

I'm a lumper, I guess, and somewhat lazy when it comes to genera i trust and GRAS. My first taste of the Boletaceae was from a midwestern Leccinum under oak... Awesome.

This overview of work says Den Bakker says at least 9 species associate with birch: http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=w ... 4KuZaf4Kvg

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Re: Leccinum pseudoscabrum

Postby mycena on Tue Sep 16, 2008 7:19 am

You know, interestingly enough, if the trees there on the U of O campus were brought in from elsewhere through a nursery, they could have hitch hiked in on their roots. There is an occurrence of Boletus edulis that is now producing in Hagley Park in Christchurch, New Zealand. B edulis is not native to New Zealand but the trees that were transplanted into the park which come through a huge nursery in Christchurch by way of the UK, have the B edulis mycelium in the roots so the mushrooms have come along for the ride. This I guess is somewhat common with trees that have been brought in from elsewhere. Could that be the same here?

I used to find a fair amount of Leccinum's in Northern Cali at Salt Point State Park but mostly associated with manzanita and madrone. For more in depth info on Leccinum go here: http://www.mushroomexpert.com/leccinum.html
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Re: Leccinum pseudoscabrum

Postby Tobiah on Tue Sep 16, 2008 8:14 pm

I too have lots of trouble with Leccinum I.d. they are all so similar, and vary in appearance only slightly at times. The only ones I have eaten were most likely Leccinum manzanitae and were moderately yummy. they however came from the diamond peak wilderness, and not manacured landscaping in front of agate hall.
I don't mind lumping most Leccina into a gereral group but am wary of orange and red capped specimens. I have heard word of mouth from peeps who have had some trubble. When it comes down to it, I'd rather eat a King anyways.
I do believe these guys are a direct connection to the beech neath they were found fruiting. Campuses round here alaways seem to landscape with a lot of non natives. Seen some neat urban fungus intermixed. thanx 4 the linx. MUCH LOVE- TOBIAH
Last edited by Tobiah on Fri Sep 19, 2008 10:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Leccinum pseudoscabrum

Postby chickenofthewoods on Tue Sep 16, 2008 9:34 pm

I'm one of those peeps.

In the high rockies there are definitely a few distinct Leccina, and every year many people become sick from eating one or another of them. It seems that the darker red-capped ones are the likely culprit, as opposed to the lighter colored orange ones associated with the Populus...

My story, which I've been repeating for a few years now, involves me as a guinea pig.

I have attended several meetings of the Colorado Mycological Society over the years, and their show at the Denver Botanical Gardens is super fun, if not simply quaint. During these affairs, I had the opportunity to discuss the toxicity of local fungi with some of the resident experts. Every year the reports come in for Leccina, but the regulars are kinda stumped by it. Most of them enjoy it without any trouble at all, and it's puzzling that there are so many reports of adverse reactions.

To my knowledge, no toxins have been identified.

So I decided haphazardly one day, whilst collecting the beautiful and delicious boletes of the area, to cut myself a little sample of this red Leccinum and toss it back, raw, right there in the field. I do not advise anyone to undertake this experiment.

My contention for years is that soooo many cases of GI irritation are caused by improper cooking methods, specifically, inadequate cooking. Meaning that I assume when someone tells me that chanterelles or boletes or even morels have made their bellies hurt, they just didn't cook them long enough. I tend to be long-winded in my advice for cooking mushrooms simply because I want people to avoid undercooking them, and thus taking the risk that some of the indigestible proteins that make up the cellular structure of mushrooms are left intact, which can cause general stomach upset.

With that in mind, I assumed that there were compounds present in these Leccina that were heat-labile, and that eating a small, one-inch cube of the flesh might give me an insightful dose of said compounds.

I was right. But the experiment was wrong. I gained valuable information, but lost my lunch. Repeatedly. For hours. It was not pretty. I felt as if I might die. My whole GI was pissed off. I had business at both ends for roughly 12 hours. I do not recommend this experiment.

But I had eaten the very same mushroom from the same habitat before, and I have eaten them since, with no ill effects.

So yeah. Exercise caution. That caution being: Learn to cook mushrooms thoroughly. Never eat mushrooms raw or undercooked.

I ate some specimens very much like yours, Tobiah, from somewhere around 17th and mill or so, last year, and they're quite scrumptious.

On another note, stay away from my campus bolete spot, you!

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Re: Leccinum pseudoscabrum

Postby chickenofthewoods on Tue Sep 16, 2008 9:46 pm

I found the comments of Michael Beug to be helpful, and he refers to none other than Marilyn Shaw, the woman who indirectly inspired my experiment. http://www.cmsweb.org/articles/poisonings_in_NA.htm

"Nearly all of the choice edible mushrooms appeared at least once in the poisoning lists. These reactions are attributed to food sensitivities. Boletes, especially Leccinum species, accounted for more than their share of poisonings by mushrooms generally considered to be edible. Even though I have never been adversely affected by Leccinum species and have eaten them a lot, after noting the number poisonings, the intensity of the symptoms, and the long period of feeling poorly, I believe my days of eating them may well be over. My colleague Marilyn Shaw has convinced me that we are not dealing with just a food sensitivity here. The questions include 1) are there several toxic Leccinum species, and/or 2) are we dealing with mushrooms that contain variable levels of toxins and so sometimes will cause poisonings and sometimes not? These questions remain to be answered. So far, I am not aware of any voucher specimens of specific Leccinum mushrooms that have caused a poisoning, and getting such vouchers in the future will help answer some of these questions."

I also appreciated Michael Kuo's comments here: http://www.mushroomexpert.com/leccinum.html

"If you are only interested in Leccinum from the standpoint of edibility you will find the genus contains many good edibles and a few mushrooms that are mildly poisonous. Avoid any orange- and red-capped species and you will be in safe territory, as far as is known. If you are using older field guides this warning may come as a surprise, but poisonings from orange and red Leccinum species are now well documented. Though the toxins are not dangerous enough to require hospitalization for healthy adults, the poisoning experience is quite unpleasant--and here I speak from personal experience (the words "human faucet" come to mind). Anyone who has collected many Leccinums will tell you that members of the genus are frequently found with brownish orange, reddish brown, orangish brown (and so on) caps, making it difficult to decide whether or not to try eating the mushroom. When the stakes are two days of misery, however, I recommend simply falling back on the old standby "When in doubt, throw it out," avoiding any Leccinum that could plausibly be described as orange or red. The best Leccinum for the table, in my opinion, is the firm-fleshed Leccinum rugosicepsMC, which appears to be eastern and southern in distribution, and is found under oaks. Like most boletes, the edible Leccinum species are best dried and reconstituted."

Although, I disagree with dismissing the red/orange species outright. In the northwest, you will find many a mycophile who enjoys their Manzanita Boletes without issues, and there are delicious red-capped species in the Cascades that are consumed eagerly and readily by many.

To each his own.
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Re: Leccinum pseudoscabrum

Postby Tobiah on Tue Sep 16, 2008 10:19 pm

I dont like chickens scratchin round my patch.....
Indeed sir, to each his own. I as well appreciated Kuos comments on Lecccinum. I seem to have a hard time discussing fungus with others who have interpereted Aurora guides as hard fact.
The Good Book is becoming quite outdated as new info. is unearthed and as species themselves change and evolve. He offers no caution concerning Leccina. Dragon dos cabesas esta= no fun. You are braver than I sir.
I also agree that alot of cases of so said mushroom poisonings are due to undercooking. And the consumption of Alcohol in conjunction with fungus. But the mushroom seems to remain the guilty party.

p.s. mill st. eh?.... (laughs maniacaly)
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Re: Leccinum pseudoscabrum

Postby ChrystieJean on Tue Sep 16, 2008 10:40 pm

lol
(hah! silly monkey eating raw mushrooms...)

Do burgundy caps count as red? The ones I used to pick under birch had dark burgundy to brown (almost black) caps and turned either pink or marbled black when cut, quite beautiful actually.
I ate them for a season or two and after a while they weren't very appetizing anymore. I think it's because I tried drying them. I really don't like dried leccinum or boletus, I've discovered. They smell like musty attic and gym socks and give me a slight headache. (allergy or sensitivity maybe?)
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