Category Archives: Articles

Mushroom Festival

banner

This event has been called one of the best mushroom shows in the country, and the biggest on the West Coast. Cascade Mycological Society (CMS) co-sponsors this spectacular show and celebration with Mt. Pisgah Arboretum and Lane Community College. Lane Community College “Biology of Mushrooms” students collect in day-long foraging expeditions held the weekend prior to the show. Each mushroom collected is carefully sorted, identified and labeled to create amazing displays. CMS volunteers collect, identify and organize more than 350 species of mushrooms in a stunning display of colors, shapes, and sizes.

Bring mushroom specimens to have identified at our “Ask an Expert” booth at the show. Visit our “Edible, Poisonous and Look-Alikes” display to learn about some mushroom species to enjoy and some others to avoid!

Admission is by donation and includes educational activities, amazing food, live music, fresh apple cider pressing, hay rides, a scarecrow contest, and the sale of edible mushrooms and native plants. Visitors also can take guided tours of the Arboretum to learn about the area’s ecology and history.

Free Parking & Shuttle – NO DOGS

Suggested Donation: $8 per person, children under 12 free.

Art

IMG_0961BATitat – Charting Nature – Navillus Press with Bill Sullivan – Sparhawk Farms – Fridays at the Farm – Wear Me Jewels – Wooden Apple Woodturning – Whistle Post Pottery – Wanna Spoon? – Eugene Weaver’s Guild – Earth Dyed

Culinary Demonstrations

11:00am – 11:30am: Three Mushroom Soups Demonstration – Jennifer Burns Bright, Author of the Blog “Culinaria Eugenius

12:00pm – 12:30pm: Wild Mushroom Dumplings Demonstration – Jennifer Burns Bright, Author of the Blog “Culinaria Eugenius

10623519_829443657100421_8095795673519943479_o1:00pm – 2:00pm: Wild Mushroom Camp-Stove Cook-Off – Featuring contestants (1) Sherri Thieben, Owner/operator of Park Street Cafe with has over 20 years of experience in the natural foods business, specializing in ethnic, vegan, vegetarian, gluten-free, and free-range meat dishes, (2) Elizabeth Stuart, Local Personal Chef and student enrolled in the mushroom class at LCC, and (3) Georgeann Castor, Self-taught Home Cook and Mushroomery Wildcrafter with lots of experience using and eating Oregon’s fungal bounty. Kimlyn Esser, Eugene Foodies Member, will Emcee this event.

3:00pm – 3:30pm: Mushroom Preservation – Matthew Kilger, Proprietor at Eating Oregon, LLC

4:00pm – 4:30pm: Medicinal Mushrooms: Preparation, Cultivation And Wild Harvesting – Jennifer Olsen, Mushroomery Owner and Wildcrafter

Food

Mushroom RaguBrew Dr. Kombucha – Cafe Mam Coffee – Sweet Cheeks Winery – Hideaway Bakery – Oriental Noodle Village – Viva Vegetarian – Ritta’s Burritos – Holy Cow- Dogs Gone Coastal

Mushrooms

Rob Miller – The Mushroomery – Rainforest Mushrooms

Festival 2009Annual Mushroom Display: Members of the Cascade Mycological Society and LCC put their time and talent into the largest mushroom display on the West Coast. Erin Blanchard is one of the invited mycologists who will be identifying the fungi at this year’s Mushroom Festival.

Music

Plants

Pierce Street Gardens – Fox Hollow Nursery – Friends of Buford Park – Doak Creek Natives – Pierce Street Gardens

GuiJoseph with a Porcini mushroom, Glen with a Cauliflower mushroomded Nature Walks

Dan Shultz- 11am
Daniel Thomas- 12pm
Bruce Newhouse- 1pm
David Wagner- 2pm
Chris Melotti- 3pm

Non-Profits

Whole Earth Nature School- StoveTeam International- Cascadia Wildlands – Travel Lane County – UO Museum of Nature and Cultural History – NABA – Eugene/Springfield – Natural History Society – Walama Restoration Project – WREN – Northwest Youth Corps …and more!

GETTING THERE

MPA is located at 34901 Frank Parrish Rd, Eugene, OR 97405. We are tucked into the larger Lane County Park called the Howard Buford Recreation Area.

map

Free Shuttle

Free shuttle from Civic Stadium every hour on the hour, and back from the Festival on the half hour!

Ride Share

Looking for a Ride Share? Log in to DriveLessConnect.com  Click on “View Events” under the Events tab in the blue toolbar. Select “Add a trip to this event” and complete your trip information and click save.  Your rideshare matches will display on the screen. If you have questions, or need assistance, please contact Tracy with Point2point at Lane Transit District at 541-682-6183.

By Car or Bike

From Interstate 5, Southbound: Exit the freeway at Exit 189. At the base of the offramp, turn right and head towards 30th Avenue. Make a left turn at the stop light at 30th Ave and cross over the freeway. At the stop sign just past the overpass, turn left. Make a right turn onto Franklin Blvd at the Shell Station and cross under the railroad bridge. Follow Franklin around a curve, then turn left on Seavey Loop Road. Continue forward for about a mile and a half. Cross a short bridge over the river. Follow the right fork of the road into the Arboretum parking lot. (See it on an interactive map.)

From Interstate 5, Northbound: Exit the freeway at Exit 189. At the stop sign at the end of the offramp, go forward. Make a right turn onto Franklin Blvd at the Shell Station and cross under the railroad bridge. Follow Franklin around a curve, then turn left on Seavey Loop Road. Continue forward for about a mile and a half. Cross a short bridge over the river. Follow the right fork of the road into the Arboretum parking lot. (See it on an interactive map.)

From South Eugene:  Take 30th Avenue past Lane Community College.  Cross the freeway overpass and turn left at the blinking stoplight.  Turn right after the Shell Station onto East Franklin Blvd. Follow this road about 1/3 mile.  Take the first left onto Seavey Loop Road.  Continue straight 2 miles to the Arboretum.

From Springfield:  Take Main Street west, crossing the river at Island Park.  Take the first left after the bridge onto Franklin Blvd.  (U-Haul is on the corner.)  Follow Franklin South, turning left at the first light onto East Franklin Blvd.  Continue on East Franklin and turn left just before the Shell Station. Follow this road about 1/3 mile.  Take the first left onto Seavey Loop Road.  Continue straight 2 miles to the Arboretum.

For more information, contact (541) 747-3817 or office@mountpisgaharboretum.org

Interested in Volunteering?

Contact office@mountpisgaharboretum.org or (541) 747-3817 if you would like to help prepare and set up for the event, take a shift at a booth during the festival day, help pack things up after the event is over, or any number of other ways to help out. Volunteers receive free admission to the festival and help to support the efforts of the arboretum!

Mycologist Erin Blanchard Will Attend the 2014 Mushroom Festival

Erin Blanchard is one of the invited mycologists who will be identifying the fungi at this year’s Mt. Pisgah Mushroom Festival.

Erin Blanchard

Erin Blanchard

About Erin Blanchard

Erin is studying the taxonomy and identification of fungi. Originally from San Diego, she moved north to San Francisco five years ago in favour of the damp weather and flourishing fungi.  She has been an active member of the Mycological Society of San Francisco and Bay Area Mycological Society, and has been involved with other California Mycology Clubs in organizing and setting up events. Erin has identified fungi for the annual MSSF Fungus Fair, San Diego Mycological Society, Fungus Federation of Santa Cruz, Point Reyes Fungus Fair, Marin Mushroom Mania, Point Reyes MycoBlitz, Humboldt Bay Mycological Society, Northeast Mycological Federation, UC Berkeley Fungal Survey of Yosemite, among other events.

Erin has moderated a message board for Mushroom Hunting and identification; she consults wild crafted food businesses, and has organized and led mushroom forays in the San Francisco Bay Area. She has worked with Dr. Else C. Vellinga sequencing the DNA of Paxillus and co-authored a poster presentation for the Mycological Society of America conference in 2009.  She has also been involved in research efforts directed by the UC Berkeley Mycology Department to identify and document species of fungi in Yosemite National Park and Point Reyes National Seashore.

Mushroom Festival Volunteer Schedule

Festival 2009Did you know that the amazing mushroom display at Mount Pisgah Arboretum’s (MPA) Mushroom Festival is entirely collected, identified, displayed and interpreted by CMS volunteers? You can help! Here’s when and how…

Saturday Oct 25

Mushroom Display

Volunteers are needed to help with the labeling and setup of the Cascade Mycological Society Mushroom Display. This process goes on all day, from morning until night. It is an exciting and invaluable way to learn about the mushrooms that fruit in our region. Contact Peg Boulay to volunteer for any part of a shift.

Erin Blanchard is one of the invited mycologists Read more »

The False “Beefsteak” Morel (Gyromitra esculenta)

Article by Bruce Pandoff
Included here with permission by equip2endure.com

It is mushroom season in many parts of the US and morels are some of the most prized popping up at this time. They are considered easy to identify but there are some potentially deadly lookalikes growing in the forest and making their entrance at the same time. The false morel, commonly known as Beefsteak Morel, or Gyromitra esculenta is one of these such poisonous mushrooms and is a common mushroom for beginning mycophagists (mushroom hunters) to poison themselves with.

Before consuming any mushroom I highly recommend seeking the in person tutelage of an expert in the field of mycology or otherwise foraging expert. Look for groups and clubs that often are lead by these experts. Check bulletin boards at libraries, civic centers, college universities, and local co-op stores for such postings by these groups seeking members. If all else fails, search the internet for a local group. I am adamant about the seeking of experts and will rarely teach about edible mushrooms except for a very small selection for the simple fact that there are expert mycologist that poison themselves each year where as I gladly teach others about plants as this phenomenon with mycologists rarely happens with botanists. As you progress always keep in mind, there are old mycophagist and there are brave mycophagist, but there are no old brave mycophagist. Often how we find out if a mushroom is poisonous is due to those brave souls finding out for us and the mycological community learning from the toxicology report. Venture forth carefully.

Here is the poisonous lookalike of the prized morel, Gyromitra esculenta. It often grows under conifers such as balsam, pine and spruce. Fruiting bodies (mushrooms) may be found in spring but summer and fall are the predominate fruiting periods.

The mushroom from a distance or to the beginner may look like a morel, but upon closer inspection key identifying features will be revealed. The surface is not truly pitted, it is wrinkled, folded, and convoluted where as true morels will be pitted like a sponge.

The stem may be white, cream, or have a slight yellow tint. When cut open the stem is solid though may have air pockets. A true morel will be hollow all the way through.

It had previously been thought that these mushrooms could be parboiled, the water discarded, to be made edible but recent evidence indicates that this is in no way a reliable method of removing all the poisons. This species and other false morels cause poisoning through a compound known as Monomethylhydrazine which is found in jet fuel. When poisoned, the victim’s symptoms will be delayed anywhere from six to twelve hours. Eventually, fatigue, headache, abdominal pain, and occasionally watery diarrhea may occur. In more extreme cases, liver damage, delirium, and occasionally death will occur. There are no antidotes as of yet. There are plenty of other edibles to learn out that do not requiring doctoring to be made edible making Gyromitra not worthwhile.

Note: Before consuming any wild vegetation or plants please consult an expert. This is for informational purposes only!

Call for CMS Mushroom Festival Volunteers

collecting mushroomsDid you know that the amazing mushroom display at Mount Pisgah Arboretum’s (MPA) Mushroom Festival is entirely collected, identified, displayed and interpreted by CMS volunteers? (Of course, we have wonderful guest experts assist us with identification.) You can help! Here’s how…

Collect mushrooms

CMS will be organizing special forays to collect mushrooms for the show – watch the CMS website for details. You can also collect mushrooms on your own and bring your treasures to MPA’s White Oak Pavilion on Saturday, 10/26, between 10 am and 3 pm.  Will your huge Cauliflower Mushroom, fresh young Stinkhorn, or picture-perfect Scaly Pholiota win “Best of Show?”

Help set up on Saturday

You can help place mushrooms in the display, hang posters and signs, set up educational displays, and organize the CMS booth. You don’t need to sign up to help out, just show up at the White Oak Pavilion on Saturday, 10/26, between 10 am and 2 pm.

Help set up on Sunday

Sunday morning, 8:30 – 10:00 AM is always a scramble to clear, clean and organize before the show opens. Again, just come early and we’ll gratefully put you to work. Help share the fungal fun – booth volunteers talk to people about the CMS mission and upcoming events. You can also Read more »