Mushroom Picking Permit Information

VISIT THE FORAYS PAGE FOR UPDATED INFORMATION.

Provided by the Cascade Mycological Society

Cascade Mycological Society

P.O. Box 110
Eugene, OR 97440

www.cascademyco.org

DISCLAIMER:

This information is provided for your general information and is liable to change without notice. The Cascade Mycological Society makes no guarantee as to the accuracy of this information. Please check with the appropriate offices for any changes. When eating mushrooms, it is vital that you are positive about identification. Poisonings occur when people eat incorrectly identified mushrooms. Using a good identification guide helps, but does not guarantee that you have a good ID. Be sure you know what you have before eating mushrooms!

Bureau of Land Management, Eugene District
3106 Pierce Parkway
Suite E
Springfield, OR 97477


Personal Use permits:

No personal use permit is required; however picking is limited to one gallon per day per person (this includes all species, edible or not). Having more than one gallon of mushrooms in your possession without a commercial permit is regarded as theft, and you can be ticketed.

Commercial permits:

 Other Districts (Salem, Medford, Coos Bay, Tillamook) do not necessarily have this restriction.

Siuslaw National Forest

541-750-7000
Florence District Office
4480 Highway 101, Bldg G
Florence, Oregon 97439
541-902-8526
Hours: Mon- Fri. 8-4:30

 

Personal Use permits:

(This is also called “incidental use.”) People visiting the Siuslaw National Forest may collect up to one gallon of mushrooms per person per day with no permit or fee required. Up to 6 of these mushrooms may be matsutake. However all matsutake mushrooms collected under incidental use must have at least ½ inch of the stem cut off immediately after picking. Selling or exchanging mushrooms gathered incidentally is a violation of Federal regulations (Title 36 CFR 261.6F), punishable by a fine of not more than $5,000 or imprisonment for not more than 6 months, or both.

 

Commercial permits:

Quantities under this permit are unlimited. Each person picking must have a permit and be at least 18 years of age. Permits may be purchased for one month of consecutive days (there is no limit to the number of permits per person per year). A one year permit is also available. Regular commercial permits do not include matsutake mushrooms. Only the following edible mushrooms are included: Chanterelles, Boletes, Oysters, Sulfur Shelf Fungus, Slippery Jack, Imperial Cats, Hedgehogs, Shaggy Manes, Lobsters, Cauliflowers, Pig’s Ears, and Coral Fungus.

 

Commercial Matsutake Permits:

 

Quantities under this permit are unlimited. Each person picking must have a permit and be at least 18 years of age. The permit will list other specific terms and conditions that apply to picking matsutake mushrooms. This is only sold as a six month permit, one permit per person per year. The exception is at the Oregon Dunes National Recreation Area, where 100 permits are offered once a year. Purchase the permit from the District office where you plan to harvest, either the Hebo, Florence, or Waldport Office or the Supervisor’s Office in Corvallis. Permits start at the 100 pound minimum and cost $27.50. They are good for one week. There are six areas on the Eugene district to pick in. For the Eugene District BLM, commercial permits can only be purchased at the Eugene District office on Wednesdays 8 to noon and 1 to 4 p.m. Other Districts (Salem, Medford, Coos Bay, Tillamook) do not necessarily have this restriction.

Willamette National Forest
3106 Pierce Parkway
Suite D
Springfield, OR 97477
541-225-6300

 

Personal Use permits:

Personal use permits are available at the Willamette National Forest office in Springfield. They are also available at the McKenzie River Ranger District office. A personal use mushroom permit issued from any of the following five forests is valid on all five forests. Deschutes, Willamette, Umpqua, Fremont, Winema. Personal use permits are free. Collections are limited to 2 gallons per day, 10 days per year (days may be non consecutive). Permits may be renewed. There are restrictions that vary by District, such as requirements to cut specimens in half. Be alert to frequent changes to the permit details, especially regarding Matsutake mushrooms. Make sure to check any regulations on the permit itself, such as whether it needs to be in your possession, and if there is a map attached.

 

Commercial permits:

For commercial use, a fee is charged. For more information about how to get a permit, fees, or regulations covering collection, please contact the Forest Service office nearest your intended activity.

In addition to general conditions, restrictions, and requirements on mushroom permits which are common to all five forests, some forests may have conditions, regulations, or restrictions for mushroom harvest that are specific to that forest.

U S National Forests
Info on permits: www.fs.fed.us.
Info on policy: www.fs.fed/us/r6/willamette

Deschutes and Ochoco National Forests
(541) 383-5300 or (541) 416-6500

Personal Use permits:

All personal collection of mushrooms requires a personal use permit which can be obtained at all Forest Service offices for the Deschutes and Ochoco National Forests. These permits have some differences in conditions, restrictions, and requirements. The Ochoco National Forest has a mushroom permit that is valid only on the Ochoco. Deschutes is part of the five forest permitting system noted under the Willamette, and personal use on the Deschutes is currently covered by the permit you get at the Willamette.

Commercial permits:

All commercial collection of mushrooms requires a commercial use permit which can only be obtained at District Forest Service offices for the Deschutes and Ochoco National Forests. There are two types of commercial permits: Permits for Matsutake mushroom; and, Permits for all mushroom species other than Matsutake.

State Lands:

For information contact the Oregon dept. of Forestry at 503-945-7200 or 503-945-7420.

Private Lands:

It goes without saying that one should get permission to pick on private lands. Neighbors or public land agencies may be able to help you find out who owns the private land you are interested in.

 

Information is from official sources and was current as of October 1, 2006.

 

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